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of the unknowns. [star spangled banner playing] [playing "taps"] [playing "america the beautiful "] >> jamie: as they make their way to the ampitheater, where president obama will speak about veterans veterans and to veterans and their families, earlier this morning, the president and the first lady hosted a breakfast for veterans at the white house. as we all remember those who have given their lives and also those who actively serve for our freedom. marm bob scales is one of those, a retired army general and fox news analyst. the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month has brought a deep resonance and meaning for all of us. we start, general scales, by welcoming you on this day that is so important and telling us what it means for you. >> thank you, jamie. it's a great honor to be here approximate to honor our veterans. vireflected on this ceremony, one of the things that strikes me, this is probably the last veterans day that will honor those men and women who are currently in action. next veterans day, the american combat presence in afghanistan will be over. a lot of old guys like m
to lead us in our pledge of allegiance. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag at the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> please be seated. it is now my distinct privilege to introduce the members of the veterans day national committee. the committee was formed by presidential order in 1954 to hold this annual observance in honor of america's veterans and to encourage and support veterans day observances throughout the nation. please hold your applause until i have introduced these special guests. if you are able, please stand when i called your name. delaney. harold fritz. national commander, disabled american veterans. national president, military officers association of america. legislative director of polish legion of american veterans. national president of korean war veterans association. albert gonzales, national commander of american gi forum. national commander, a jewish war veterans of the usa. national commander of american express years of war. national commander of catholic war
in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. and need to get my car fixed? progressive makes it easy, because we give you choices. you can pick where to get your car fixed, we can cut you a check, or, at our service center, we take care of everything for you. [ relaxing music playing ] [ chuckles ] -whew, so many choices. -take your time. -the service center. -okay. giving you choices -- now, that's progressive. call or click today. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> welcome to "reliable sources." we're going to look at the election an its aftermath. joining us in that conversation, peter backer, correspondent for "the new york times." jackie kucinich, reporter for u.s. today and fred francis, founder of 15seconds.com. so the drama, mel low drama of the election night, fox news has projected obama has w
is not resonating with 21st century america. if you continue on the same track the party will keep losing ground. host: from "the weekly standard," in both cases president bush and president obama winning by a margin of victory by 2.4%. guest: that does not surprise me. i knew it was going to be minutes before the republican party through mitt romney under the bus. i do think he was a weak candidate, but the republicans nominated him as a behind him and insisted he was the answer to america's prayers. they did not have any choice. when you look at the other choices in the primary, who would have done a better job? herman cain? michele bachmann? jeb bush did not run. they got stuck with mitt romney. host: california has gone from a republican to a purple to a solid democratic state. what has changed? ronald reagan winning back in 1984. guest: i am proud to take a little bit of credit for that four at one time being the democratic party chair in california. the republican party is a mirror of the national republican party in the sense that i think they lost track of where the country was moving. r
everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the cit
. >> thank you. for those who believe that america is founded is the greatest country in the history of the world, we wanted someone who would fight for us. we wanted a fighter like ronald reagan who boldly championed america opposing founding principles who inspired millions of independence and reagan democrats to join us and who fought his leftist opponents on the -- idea that america was a shining city upon a hill. what we got was a week moderate candidate handpicked by the beltway elite and country club establishment wing of the republican party. the presidential loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss, the tea party is the last best hope america has to restore her founding principles. while it may take longer to restore with president, back in office we're not going away. it took nearly 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than 3 1/2 years to restore our constitution. we're going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution and we now that for america to succeed, we need to continue educating americans on our core principl
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. it's the weekend after, and barack obama is back in the white house, democrats are back in control of the senate, and republicans are back running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 a
>>> good morning, america. this morning -- breaking news overnight. a mysterious explosion kills two people and damages more than a dozen home. right now, there's still no word that caused the blast that decimated an entire neighborhood. >>> uncovered. a flood of new details this morning about how the fbi discovered the extramarital affair that brought down america's top spy as we learn more about the highly-accomplished woman at the center of this scandal. an exclusive interview with a wounded warrior who she helped. >>> black thursday backlash. holiday shopping season is starting earlier than ever with many stores opening their doors on thanksgiving offering better bargains. but now, some employees are fighting back. ♪ >>> and boyfriend no more. the headline gripping tween girls worldwide. the biebs is single. we have new pictures of a crestfallen ex-girlfriend selena gomez. a look at how other young couples have done after a breakup in the spotlight. ♪ >>> good morning, everybody. >> we warned you yesterday that this breakup was happening. now it's official. >> we're all a
that brought down america's top spy as we learn more about the woman at the center of this scandal. >>> black thursday backlash. holiday shopping season is starting earlier than ever with many stores opening their doors on thanksgiving offering better bar gains. now, some employees are fighting back. ♪ >>> and boyfriend no more. the headline gripping tween girls worldwide. biebs is single. a crest fallen ex-girlfriend selena gomez. ♪ >>> good morning, everybody. >> we warn cody you yesterday that this breakup was happening. it's official. >> we're all absorbing the news. ron, particularly. >> it's rough. >> rough. we should say, we do have some holiday shopping news. not only as we mentioned before, not only is the holiday season starting early and some people are upset about that, also the thieves are getting an early start. take a look at this surveillance video, thieves ripped gifts that were put on layaway. >>> also this morning -- coffee lovers, listen up. experts are warning that the most common beans used for their morning cup joe could dry up and become extinct. we'll tell you why
are fascinating and a little scary. it might well be the future of politics in america. >>> also, sea barriers, wetlands, futuristic construction materials. what is the answer to climate change and how can we all adapt to this new normal of hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods? i'll talk to jeffrey sachs and "time" magazine's brian walsh. >>> and why is there such an antiqued way of voting? i'll take a look. but first here's my take. growing up in the india in the 1960s and '70s, ales thought of america as the future. it was the place where the newest technology, the best gadgets, the latest fads seemed to originate. seemingly exotic political causes, women's liberation, gay rights, ageism, always seemed to get their start on the streets of the united states orthopedic in the courts and legislatures. for me, tuesday's election brought back that sense of america as the future. the presidential race has been discussed as one that was about nothing with no message or mandate, but i don't think that's true. put aside the re-election of barack obama and consider what else happened this week. three sta
languages as well. >> and we have some more than 70 writers from different countries , from latin america and spain that will be with us as well as the featured country this year, the country of pair guy. and we invite you to the opening of the pavilion next thursday, and we will have the first lady of the country doing the honors of opening the pavilion. so please come by, learn about their culture, traditions and their literature throughout the whole weekend. >> and if you'll welcome -- if you'll excuse on a personal note, i've been working with alina very closely. alina's the executive director of the center here at the college. before that she was the executive director of the miami book fair for i won't tell you how many years. [laughter] it was a lot of years. >> a lot. >> and it's just been announced that alina is now the director of -- executive director of cultural affairs for the entire miami-dade college. we want to congratulate her on her new appointment as well. [applause] >> thank you, thank you. i'm looking forward to that. and part of my new responsibilities is to also wor
said when the gap back to america he would train slaves that they would become could citizens and free people of the united states. but when he got back things changed. >> welcome to the 303rd annual american book awards co-sponsored by the columbus foundation. we chose the name to indicate as far as we know know, there have been 30,000 years of steroid -- storytelling. so the border directors are john d. macarthur and the but finally the lawyer for the state of california. this event it is being co-sponsored we'll acknowledge their generosity to bring s to the historic room. we want to welcome richard hudson to greet you and it is professor of marriages and a member of the faculty of american studies and interdisciplinary program. he came to the uc berkeley english department 1964 although he continues teaching and tell this but he it is now president of the west literature association. and that the berkley's annual conference in october and then he said the buck with that. [laughter] >> i basically want to say one word. you happen to be in this tool room of the english department. i'
affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. so, which supeast 4g lte service would yochoose, based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. neil: i'm not saying we have a revolt on our hands, but we have, at least from the eyes of critic z, john boehner a revolting thought, the idea that the leader of the republicans of the house of represe
that america had a great senate from the early 1960's through 1980, a group of people who were focused on the national interests and were in the forefront of every issue facing the country. it is the senate of hubert humphrey, howard baker, robert and ted kennedy, robert dole and many others. they were an unusual group and they were triggered, in my estimation, by their war experience, the need for dealing with the cold war, and a progressive impulse that focused on some moral imperatives starting with civil rights. what you see is that senate was at the forefront of everything and accomplish an enormous amount over that period of time. host: what is it about the times we live in now makes the operation of the senate different from the way the senate operates during the time you were writing about between 1962 and 1980? guest: i always say it is harder to be a search senator today with the demands of campaign fund-raising -- to be a senator today with the demands of campaign fund-raising and the type of media we have, 24 our media, political conversation on facebook and twitter - 24-ho
they put him under tremendous pressure and kept asking him, when is america going to free the slaves? so he began making promises that emancipation was really just around the corner. it was imminent. we were waiting for opinions are ripened. none of this was really true, but it was in our interest ran to say that. oddly enough jefferson really did those are some of this radical feeling over there in france. before he left he's set down a plan and told people about it. he told thomas paine, william short, number of other abolitionists over there. .. >> we want to welcome everybody -- we want to welcome everybody to the 33rd annual american book awards sponsored by the four columbus foundation. we choose the name to indicate that as far as we know there's been 30,000 years of storytelling in north america. so the members of our board of directors are john macarthur fellow, recipient of the presidential medal. the current chancellor of the academy of american poets and finally, the current lawyer for the state of california. this will be cosponsored by the english department
san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz, and her husband former secretary of state george schultz. former mayor willie brown. [cheers and applause] and former mayor frank jordan. we want to acknowledge the husband of united states senator and former mayor dianne feinstein, mr. richard bloom. the wife of former mayor gina mos coney and the wife of former mayor joe alliteo, catherine. the sister of former mayor george christopher. the board board and the rest of the city family who has made this event possible. we are also honored to be joined by several giants dignitaries. president and ceo larry baer and his wife sam. [cheers and applause] . giants vice president and general manager brian saibian and his wife amanda. [cheers and applause] the wife of the skip
cardenis and patrick millsap. first to you, al, are whites the new minority here in america, especially when it comes to elections? >> it will be soon. when ronald reagan, our gold standard, won in 1980, it was 87% of the vote. this year, it was 72% of the vote. it will be 68% of the vote in 2016. and by the 2020s, it will be the minority vote in america. >> i'm going to ask patrick the same question. patrick, what do you think? >> at first, we have an outreach problem. we are banking on vote that is we don't necessarily put in the bank and we are counting the votes that clearly aren't necessarily being there. we have to work on that. >> but my question, do you think whites are the new minority, especially when it comes to politics now? >> i don't want to agree with your premise of this adjective of voting bloc. the interesting numbers is income level, taxable incomes. those are the more interesting numbers, to me. evangelicals. >> so, gentlemen, let's talk about the gop's future here. i want you to consider this. al talked about it just a moment ago. 1980, reagan beat carter, 56% of th
an expensive natural gas. we are now in the middle of america and energy revolution. as john maynard keynes said when the facts change, i change my mind. what do you do? the facts have changed. we have been staged on have to ask iran are saudi arabia to send it to us. we have so much natural gas we're talking about exporting at rise in the op-ed describes today that chemical manufacturers 1/2 unattractive back to america up for it it is so cheap rushes it is worried its hold on the eastern european economy will fail because we cannot supply them with natural gas. instead of russia. in this environment subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. refi china and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it i
hear you. >> the time for change has come. chris: the new america, the country makes history again. doubling down on hope and barack obama. what does the winner hope will give him and more important us a second term upgrade? will the hard right in the house give thumbs down for the re-elected president, will they risk the fiscal abyss to keep their ties to the tea party? and finally, this is my country. even mitt romney was echoing that cry from the anti-obama crowd, pledging to take our country back. but that is deep in the past. no matter how hard they want it, america's fewer you to -- future just won't look like the early 1950's. hi, i'm chris matthews. welcome to the show. with us today, the washington post bob woodward. "the washington post" kathleen parker, "the new york times" d helen cooper. first up. barack obama's place in american presidential history was upgrated tuesday with his convincing sweeping re-election by an entirely new american elect rat. -- electorate. >> we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions and we remain more than a collection of red sta
, complete with america's softest tissue, you're also giving a warm gesture of care. kleenex®. america's softest tissue. ♪ in everything you do [ female announcer ] add your own ingredients to hamburger helper for a fresh take on a quick, delicious meal. it's one box with hundreds of possibilities. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> a once rundown public housing project near nats park in d.c. is now a unique mix of affordable housing and homes with up to $1 million. tom sherwood takes us there. >> reporter: 37-year-old chanel caldwell was holding her ribbon cutting scissors tight. the former ambulance driver couldn't stop smiling. ten years ago, she was moved out of this rundown rat-infested public housing at third and l street near capitol hill. and was promised ten years ago new housing when it was built. >> i thought was never coming back. we moved to richmond. but there were no jobs ther
america fund two and i think that's where all the energy needs to be put. that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because as we these minor changes in the financials of telephone companies across the country, it was so important we do these things coincidentally. we have one done very effectively. it is happening in real time. it is showing up in the numbers today. it is about the consumer. >> jeff gardner is president and ceo of the windstream corporation and chairman of the u.s. telecom trade association. he has been our guest on "the communicators." gentleman, thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve entitlement reform. i am proposing we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise. i am open to new ideas. i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach t
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on the affair that brought down the most powerful spy chief in america. >>> $7 trillion in tax increases and spending cuts. and the threat of another recession. that's the fiscal cliff that looms ahead. 51 days away. >> reporter: they're our fathers, other mothers, our sons and daughters. this veterans day we honor the heroes that fight for america's freedom. sfwlimplt good morning. happy veterans day. i'm randi kaye. we start with new details on the scandal that led to the resignation of cia director general david petraeus. >> the woman who wrote the biography was sending harassing emails to another woman close to the cia director that prompted the fbi to investigate. also we know from that source that the investigation led to the discovery of e-mails between broadwell and petraeus that indicated the affair. more details are coming out about the timeline of events and when u.s. officials were notified of the circumstances of this investigation. the fbi informed the director of national intelligence james clapper about the investigation on tuesday night, election night. just as some poll
.s. comptroller general. today he's the ceo of comeback america and he's a deficit hawk. the ceo of pimco. hisfirm is one of the largest investors of bonds, and steve moore is a conservative, founder of club for growth and a writer at the wall street journal. i'm going to start with you, steven, my good friend. the fiscal cliff is an immediate threat. both parties need to come together to fix it, because not fixing it would set even fiscal conservatives back, don't you agree? >> yeah, and i think other conservatives agree that he don't want to go off this fiscal cliff, either. i think one hangup that will start on tuesday is the president will say, look, i was reelected to raise those tax rates on the rich, and you know what those republicans are saying in the house, ali? well, you know what, we were electing not to raise those tax rates. you can get agreement on entitlement reform, raising revenues and do some common sense things to get control over the next ten years. we're not that far apart. >> yeah, and i can also grow some hair and look like brad pitt. let me bring mohammad in. in a letter t
historic constitutional freedoms >> no more from america -- book tv college series. this interview was recorded at the united states naval academy. it's about ten minutes. >> on your screen now, professor of history at the u.s. table academy. author of several books, including his most recent, american sheikhs, to families,j) for generations, and the storyk) of americj)a's influence in then middle east. who was dana? >> the founder of what later became the american university of beirut. >> added he go about doing that? >> a lot of american entrepreneur real spirit. >> made the family quite wealthy. >> what was his goal in founding the american university? >> his initial goal differ from a became his life's work. he arrived in the middle east and 1850's determined to convert muslims to christianity and very quickly realized that wasn't going to happen and that's the way to make a connection was not to convert them, but to educate them and to improve their lives and tangible, concrete ways because that is with they responded to positively. once he had that in sight he ran with it and
of the united states of america over the last decade than any single individual and he's a good leader. and what leaders do, when they're put in a difficult position is, they lead. and he led here by doing what he thought was the right thing. and i think he did do the right thing. i don't think there's any question. it would have been very difficult to continue in his position, if subordinates engaged in similar actions. i think that's the right process. >> two more quick questions then i want to move on to senator murray. was general petraeus straight with you and the committee during the confirmation process? wa vetting process? i know that he's not going to appear before your committee to discuss the situation in benghazi, do you want to hear from him at some point? >> we have had a conversation, you know, he's trying to put his life back together right now and that's what he needs to focus on. his very capable deputy is going to be testifying next thursday. that's fine. because he certainly was there when all of the decisions for made relative to benghazi. at the end of the day, i wouldn't r
'm going to kind of be the moderator for tonight, as we go through this first-ever challenge america summit. so i've got just a few things that, you know, i wanted to do with everyone, before we get into the program. first of all, i just want to take a minute and have everyone just look around this room. in this room, we have amazing people that are corporate, nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful,interf people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are, what we're tiqp)q)s that we have.roup of so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open, unoodle, and nasa. it's a program from nasa's office of centennial challenges. and it's challengin the best innovators in america to create radica
places. america is now 29th in the speed of the internet behind such leading industrialites as ukraine. we pay 38 times what the japanese pay for a bit of information. if you buy a triple play package -- i have one in my home -- you pay on average with taxes in the u.s., $160. in france, you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries, not just the u.s. and canada you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and ten times faster downloading, and you're paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand, fundamental principle in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along it was highways, interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information super highway. and what does the industry say? don't call it that. the rest of the world -- >> did they literally say that. >> guest: i was told by the pr person
a story sufficient to explain what america wants? now, listening to the president on tuesday night, i noticed a subtle but important shift in how he is thinking about the second term. in both 2008 and this past tuesday, president obama told a story during his speech. in 2008, the narrative of the then president-elect obama gave was about his win was a culmination of struggle. he told the narrative of 106-year-old ann nixon cooper who cast her ballot in atlanta that evening. >> she was born just a general ration past slavery, a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky. when someone like her couldn't vote for two reasons. because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin. and tonight i think about all that she's seen throughout her century in america. the heartache and the hope. the struggle and the progress. the times we with told that we can't and the people who pressed on with that american creed, yes, we can. >> so in 2008, the president saw his own election as fulfilling a legacy of struggle. but the story he told in 2012 was not a story of culminati
and longitude the wages of sick pes, the politics of health insurance, and progressive america. that the university of north carolina put out. this is a history -- her book and rather her talk today will be partly the history of rights and rations in the united states from the great depression to the present and the book just came out this month by the university of chicago press. i have seen copies of it flying around. i wish i had one to hold up here. by all accounteds, dr. hoffman has simply nailed this big historical topic up to the present moment. i'm going read a few blerp from the early review how that is being received. author of the "healing of america" writes this, in the american political debate, everybody condemns the notion of rationing health care. but beatrix hoffman's history shows that rationing by income, age, employment, et. cetera has been and remains a central element of america's medical system. she demonstrated that our various attempts at reforms over the decades have kept the rationing mechanism firmly in place. talk about death panel too -- i don't kn
vociferously in america for a comment you are said to have made that you wanted israel to be wiped off the map, wiped off the face of the earth. there have been many different interpretations of what you said. you have disputed the meaning that was then translated from the original farsi. let me give you this opportunity to say exactly what you did say and to say exactly what you did mean. >> translator: we have been condemning the united states for many things, for having deposed a dictator with a revolution, for having sought freedom and free elections, for not allowing our oil and national treasure to leave our country freely, for having stood up to very dangerous terrorists in the region, for having stood up against saddam hussein, who enjoyed the backing of many. we stood up against him and did not allow the occupation of our territory. we have been condemned for a great many things. because we said justice for all. the rule of law for all. the right of peaceful nuclear energy for all. >> do you want, mr. president, do you want -- >> translator: allow me, sir. allow me, please. >> the que
of how that is being received. t.r. reid, is author of healing of america writes this, in the american political debate, everybody condemns the notion of rationing health care. but beatrix hoffman meticulous history shows that rationing by income, age, implement, et cetera, as the end remains a central element of america's medical system. she demonstrates that our various attempts at reform over the decades have kept the rationing mechanisms firmly in place. so i wonder do you think she'll talk about death panels, to? i don't know. jonathan oberlander was author of the political life of medicare rights this, excuse me, my allergies are showing up this morning. beatrice hoffmann skillfully chronicles america's struggles to make health care a right from the depression through obamacare. have beautifully written account explores the pervasive rationing of medical care and insurance and are staggering and equal health system. health care for some is a compelling reminder of how far we have come but also how far reform solicitor in the united states. the reviews keep this tone throughout. b
. >> we did this to get in the business of freeing america from your phonies and cronies that currently dominate the political establish mefnlt. >> reporter: ramsey is a libertarian who believes in lower taxes, less government spending, and more civil liberties. when ron paul dropped out of the presidential race, ramsey looked for new outlet for his political energy. >> well, superpac, you're able to facilitate a conversation, able to provide voters access to information. >> i'm tim bishop. how are you. >> reporter: democrat tim bishop, five-term new york congressman was the target of another small superpac created to remove him from office. >> big hearts beat big checks every day of the week. >> reporter: bishop was hit by $1 million in negative ads and direct mail from prosperity first. $750,000 came from one constituent, hedge fund manager robert mercer. mercer declined to answer questions, but bishop believes he might have been motivated by bishop's vote for new financial industry regulation. >> what it was designed to do is to fix some of the systemic problems that resulted in the
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